DeafHealth Works With You to Provide Workshops & Training

At DeafHealth, we are all about collaboration and making healthcare more accessible for deaf communities. We team up with YOU to develop tailored training programs, presentations, and workshops. We’re in this together, working towards a more inclusive healthcare for all.  

Stay Informed in ASL: We’ve got you covered! Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for new and current health updates. 

Transcript and Video Description

[Video Description: The post has a video thumbnail with blue shading overlaid. The middle has a text bubble that reads “Community Collaboration at DeafHealth” in white text with rose background. In the video: A young woman in a black dress with her brown hair pulled back looks to the camera with red glasses.  

Transcript: What does DeafHealth do? We provide workshops, training, and presentations to a wide range of stakeholders, hearing or deaf, such as: healthcare providers, policymakers, government, community advocates, and our deaf peers. Our content typically focuses on: 1) Improving communication and accessibility in healthcare for deaf patients. 2) How to comply with laws and policies in healthcare for deaf patients. 3) specific healthcare topics such as telehealth, health literacy, and so much more. We work with you to achieve awareness and change to break barriers in healthcare. [The screen fades to show a thumbnail of a faded white background of a doctor holding hands with another individual] Deaf. Healthy. DeafHealth. Learn more at www.deafhealthaccess.org.]

Deaf People Are Already Advocates

We recognize that Deaf people are already advocates. We advocate for ourselves every day and especially for healthcare; but it’s exhausting, and we shouldn’t have to. DeafHealth wants to change that narrative.

Stay Informed in ASL: We’ve got you covered! Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for new and current health updates. 

Video Description and Transcript

Video Description:

The post has a video thumbnail with blue shading overlaid. The middle has a text bubble that reads “Deaf people are advocates” in white text with rose background. In the video:  A young woman with brown curly hair is standing in front of the camera with a green couch and decorative items behind her. She is wearing a black dress with clear-framed glasses.

Transcript:

Deaf people are ALREADY advocates. We advocate for ourselves everyday. We always enter the doctor’s office mentally preparing to navigate a system that is not accommodating to our needs. We know that we have to bear the burden of educating, reminding them, and enforcing our rights. Maybe this feels normal to us, because we deal with this everyday. But it’s not, and it’s wrong. [The screen fades to show a thumbnail of a faded white background of a doctor holding hands with another individual] Deaf. Healthy. DeafHealth. Learn more at www.deafhealthaccess.org.]

Ensuring Inclusive Healthcare Content for Deaf Communities

Being able to understand important health information is critical. This is an example of what accessible healthcare content looks like, such as:

  1. Using a deaf native signer, such as a Certified Deaf Interpreter;
  2. Captioning the content simultaneously; and
  3. Organizing complex content that is easy to understand.

Check it out: youtube.com/tptnow

Stay Informed in ASL: We’ve got you covered! Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for new and current health updates. 

Video Description and Transcript

Video Description:

The post has a video thumbnail with blue shading overlaid. The middle has a text bubble that reads “What accessible healthcare content looks like” in white text with rose background. In the video: A young woman with brown curly hair is standing in front of the camera with a green couch and decorative items behind her. She is wearing a black shirt with clear-framed glasses.

Transcript:

This is what accessible healthcare content looks like! Their content is accessible and easy to understand because they use a Deaf native signer, such as a CDI, to provide ASL translation on-screen. They captioned their content, and broke down their videos in a way that is easier for us, the viewers, to understand without being overwhelmed. Curious to know more about their content? Check their playlist out! Link in caption. [The screen fades to show a thumbnail of a faded white background of a doctor holding hands with another individual] Deaf. Healthy. DeafHealth. Learn more at www.deafhealthaccess.org.]

What Does Our Community Engagement Look Like?

At DeafHealth, community engagement is at the heart of what we do. What’s that? Let us break it down for you!

Want more updates on our community engagement work? Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for more.

Video Description and Transcript

Video Description:

The post has a video thumbnail with blue shading overlaid. The middle has a text bubble that reads “Community engagement at DeafHealth” in white text with rose background. In the video: A woman with long blonde hair is sitting in front of the camera and she is wearing a black shirt and pink lipstick.

Transcript:

What does DeafHealth do? We do community engagement. That looks like: Working with our communities, listening, and gathering information, your feedback, opinions, and perspectives. We also provide information, resources, support, and we help connect. One example is our focus groups. Focus groups are a powerful tool to use for research, project implementation, or problem solving. It’s important to include us deaf people too. Curious what our focus groups look like? Stay tuned! [The screen fades to show a thumbnail of a faded white background of a doctor holding hands with another individual] Deaf. Healthy. DeafHealth. Learn more at www.deafhealthaccess.org.]

DeafHealth Responds to Federal Acknowledgement

Last week, DeafHealth submitted public comment, advocating for change. Responding to a proposed rulemaking by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights, which agreed that people with disabilities face widespread discrimination in accessing healthcare, DeafHealth demanded more for our deaf communities.

The acknowledgement of bias and mistreatment that we face in everyday healthcare was profound, but it was no surprise for deaf communities who live this experience. While we were grateful and relieved that the federal government was recognizing this decades-long injustice, we advocated that more is needed to effectively challenge the status quo here.

Just as much as the law needs text, our communities need teeth; we need stronger enforcement of the laws. For too long we have borne the consequences of significant health disparities and poorer health outcomes. No more. Join us in that change.

Read more on DeafHealth's comment here.

Stay Informed in ASL: We’ve got you covered! Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for new and current health updates. 

Video Description and Transcript

Video Description:

The post has a video thumbnail with blue shading overlaid. The middle has a text bubble that reads “Federal gov’t recognizes widespread discrimination” in white text with rose background. In the video: A woman with light brown long hair is standing in front of the camera with a blue couch and framed diplomas behind her. She is wearing a black blazer and a black shirt.

Transcript:

WOW. The federal government just acknowledged our experience, as people with disabilities relating to healthcare. They said: widespread discrimination. This is not a surprise for deaf communities. We live that experience. We know that. We also agree that it needs to change. DeafHealth agrees too, and we submitted a public comment saying that. We also said that we need more –We need more education, we need more enforcement. Historically, deaf communities bear the burden of the consequences of this discrimination and casual enforcement. No more. We can’t continue that. But DeafHealth is doing more than submitting letters like this. We are rolling our sleeves and actively participating in that change. Join us. [The screen fades to show a thumbnail of a faded white background of a doctor holding hands with another individual] Deaf. Healthy. DeafHealth. Learn more at www.deafhealthaccess.org.]

Check Out Our Video Library!

Love staying in the loop with health info in ASL? We’ve got exciting news for you! Explore our fresh video library on our website by checking out www.deafhealthaccess.org/updates. Enjoy! 🤟 

Stay Informed in ASL: We’ve got you covered! Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for new and current health updates. 

Video Description and Transcript

Video Description:

The post has a video thumbnail with blue shading overlaid. The top middle has “Try our ASL video library!” in white text with a rose background. In the video: A young woman with brown shoulder length curly hair is sitting in front of the camera with shelves, books, and decorative items behind her. She is wearing a black shirt with red framed glasses. 

Transcript:

Do you like staying updated with health based videos in ASL? Guess what? We have a video library on our website to help you stay informed and caught up on information related to COVID, health based information, and health tips! Check it out! www.deafhealthaccess.org/updates [The screen fades to show a thumbnail of a faded white background of a doctor holding hands with another individual] Deaf. Healthy. DeafHealth. Learn more at www.deafhealthaccess.org.]

What are Vaccinations?

How do vaccines work? They act as a shield to protect you from harmful viruses and germs! 🤧 Watch the video to learn more about how vaccines work.  

Vaccines, treatments, and testing for COVID-19 are available:  

1️⃣ Get Your Free COVID-19 Vaccine: Find where you can get vaccinated at: www.vaccines.gov.  

2️⃣ Find a Testing Location: Find COVID-19 tests at a place close to you at: www.testinglocator.cdc.gov. You can also order four free COVID-19 tests per household at www.covidtests.gov.  

3️⃣ Ask Your Doctor: If you’re sick or uncertain, ask your doctor to discuss next steps for treatment, such as medication that can prevent severe COVID-19. 

Stay Informed in ASL: We’ve got you covered! Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for new and current health updates. 

Video Description and Transcript

Video Description:

The post has a video thumbnail with blue shading overlaid. The top middle has “What are Vaccines!” in white text with rose background. In the video: A young woman with brown shoulder length curly hair is sitting in front of the camera with shelves, books, and decorative items behind her. She is wearing a black V-neck shirt with clear framed glasses. 

Transcript:

What do vaccines do for you? Vaccines will help you shield your body and train your body to fight germs. Do you only get vaccinated once? No, because viruses can change and evolve over time. Getting annual vaccinations will “update” your body to be prepared to fight annual viruses and infections. If you aren’t sure if you need to get vaccinated, make sure to check in and clarify with your doctor. [The screen fades to show a thumbnail of a faded white background of a doctor holding hands with another individual] Deaf. Healthy. DeafHealth. Learn more at www.deafhealthaccess.org.]

Get Vaccinated with Us!

Ever wonder what it’s like to get a vaccine? Worry not, DeafHealth is here to give you the inside scoop – check it out! 

☝️ Don’t forget: The CDC encourages everyone to get vaccinated ASAP by mid-October. You can get your free COVID-19 vaccine by finding a place near you at: www.vaccines.gov.  

💉 Get double boosted! The CDC says it’s safe to get both COVID-19 and flu shots at the same time: www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/coadministration.htm.  

Stay Informed in ASL: We’ve got you covered! Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for new and current health updates. 

Video Description and Transcript

Video Description:

The post has a video thumbnail with blue shading overlaid. The top middle has “Get vaccinated with us!” in white text with rose background. In the video: A young woman with long blonde wavy hair is walking around and standing in a pharmacy for her COVID-19 and flu vaccination. She is wearing a dark blue dress with sunglasses.  

Transcript:

Today, we will get vaccinated! Ready? Come on! [The young woman is waiting at the pharmacy’s check in desk.] Now, we’re waiting for insurance forms and cards to be reviewed. If you don’t have insurance, you still can get a free COVID-19 vaccine through the federal government. [The young woman is sitting in the waiting room.] Now, we’re waiting for my turn! You should sign up for your vaccine online if you can – many places allow you to schedule an appointment for your vaccine. Sometimes you will be required to fill out forms and provide information such as if you have any allergies to the shots, your current address, and so on. [The pharmacist is giving the young woman her COVID-19 and flu shots.] Thumbs up! Thank you. [The young woman is standing in front of medication at the pharmacy.] I got two shots today for COVID-19 and flu. Yes – it's safe! The CDC recommends both shots at the same time because we have a tendency, as shown by research, to procrastinate. If we get one shot at one time, we are likely to postpone the second shot and forget. So, go ahead and get both shots at the same time! [The young woman is sitting in the car and shows her bandaid.] The CDC recommends that if you are high risk or have a weakened immune system, get your shots ASAP! For the general population, it’s recommended to get your shots by mid-October. Go get vaccinated NOW! [The screen fades to show a thumbnail of a faded white background of a doctor holding hands with another individual] Deaf. Healthy. DeafHealth. Learn more at www.deafhealthaccess.org.] 

Don't Forget to Renew Medicaid!

🚨 Alert for Medicaid users! 🚨 

This year, Medicaid renewal is NOT automatic. 🚫 Here’s how to make sure you keep your important health benefits: 

1️⃣ Stay Informed: Keep an eye on your mailbox and inbox. Read those letters and emails from Medicaid, your health department, or your insurance marketplace.  

2️⃣ Update, Update, Update: If your contact info has changed, be sure to update! 

3️⃣ Mark Those Dates: Deadlines matter! Set reminders to make sure you renew on time and don't miss out. 

Your health is important, and so is staying covered! 

Stay Informed in ASL: We’ve got you covered! Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for new and current health updates. 

Video Description and Transcript

Video Description:

The post has a video thumbnail with blue shading overlaid. The top middle has “Renew your Medicaid” in white text with a rose background. In the video: A young woman with brown shoulder length curly hair is sitting in front of the camera with shelves, books, and decorative items behind her. She is wearing a black shirt with red framed glasses.

Transcript:

Do you use Medicaid? Have you renewed? Did you know that this year, Medicaid does not automatically renew? It is important to renew to be able to continue receiving your benefits but, how do you renew? You will need to make sure your contact information is updated and current. If you receive any letters from Medicaid, health insurance marketplace, and your health department, read the letters and stay informed! Be aware of any deadlines and keep your information current! You will be able to keep your insurance. [The screen fades to show a thumbnail of a faded white background of a doctor holding hands with another individual] Deaf. Healthy. DeafHealth. Learn more at www.deafhealthaccess.org.]

Get Your Free COVID-19 Tests Now!

Don’t miss this opportunity! Get 4 free COVID tests at covidtests.gov! Hurry while supplies last - sign up here: covidtests.gov 

Stay Informed in ASL: We’ve got you covered! Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for new and current health updates. 

Video Description and Transcript

Video Description:

The post has a video thumbnail with blue shading overlaid. The top middle has “Get Free COVID-19 Tests!” in white text with a rose background. In the video: A young woman with brown shoulder length curly hair is sitting in front a green screen screenshot of the website covidtests.gov. She is wearing a black off the shoulder shirt with tank-top and clear rimmed glasses.

Transcript:

Grab this opportunity now! Get free COVID-19 tests at this website here! (she points to COVIDTests.gov). Sign up, type in your home address, and you will get 4 free COVID-19 tests for your household. Take advantage of this opportunity while supplies still last! [The screen fades to show a thumbnail of a faded white background of a doctor holding hands with another individual] Deaf. Healthy. DeafHealth. Learn more at www.deafhealthaccess.org.]