DeafHealth Works With You to Provide Workshops & Training

At DeafHealth, we are all about collaboration and making healthcare more accessible for deaf communities. We team up with YOU to develop tailored training programs, presentations, and workshops. We’re in this together, working towards a more inclusive healthcare for all.  

Stay Informed in ASL: We’ve got you covered! Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for new and current health updates. 

Transcript and Video Description

[Video Description: The post has a video thumbnail with blue shading overlaid. The middle has a text bubble that reads “Community Collaboration at DeafHealth” in white text with rose background. In the video: A young woman in a black dress with her brown hair pulled back looks to the camera with red glasses.  

Transcript: What does DeafHealth do? We provide workshops, training, and presentations to a wide range of stakeholders, hearing or deaf, such as: healthcare providers, policymakers, government, community advocates, and our deaf peers. Our content typically focuses on: 1) Improving communication and accessibility in healthcare for deaf patients. 2) How to comply with laws and policies in healthcare for deaf patients. 3) specific healthcare topics such as telehealth, health literacy, and so much more. We work with you to achieve awareness and change to break barriers in healthcare. [The screen fades to show a thumbnail of a faded white background of a doctor holding hands with another individual] Deaf. Healthy. DeafHealth. Learn more at www.deafhealthaccess.org.]

988 Available in American Sign Language

May is National Mental Health Awareness Month. Made possible by Direct Video Calling (DVC) technology, any Deaf or hard of hearing individual can contact www.988lifeline.org directly in American Sign Language by dialing 9-8-8. 

If someone is experiencing difficult thoughts, a mental health crisis, or a substance abuse crisis, they can access the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline in several ways to receive support:  

1. Videophone: Dial 988 on your VP.*  

2. Desktop or Laptop: Visit 988’s webpage for Deaf and Hard of Hearing users (https://988lifeline.org/help-yourself/for-deaf-hard-of-hearing/) and scroll down to find the ASL Now button.  

3. Chat or Text: Visit 988’s webpage for chat and text (https://988lifeline.org/chat/) and follow the instructions to start a conversation with your preferred chat method.  

*Make sure that your videophone is updated. Need help on how to update your software and platforms? Please contact your videophone provider through their customer care team, such as Sorenson, Purple, Convo, and ZVRS.

Stay Informed in ASL: We’ve got you covered! Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for new and current health updates. 

Transcript and Video Description

[Video Description: The post has a video thumbnail with a teal shading overlaid. The middle has a text bubble that reads “What is 988?” in white text with rose background. In the video: a young woman with clear glasses wears a white striped shirt. 

Transcript: What is 988? It’s the national 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline service provided by the federal government for free. If you need support when you are facing difficult thoughts and emotions, mental health struggles, or substance abuse crises, 988 is available to support you. You can call or text 988 anytime. 988 is available 24/7! Wonderful, right? How do you connect with a crisis counselor directly in ASL? You can connect with them online by visiting the website and clicking on ASL Now. It is your choice if you want to chat, text, or use a videophone. Heads up! Make sure your videophone is upgraded and up-to-date to be able to easily connect with an ASL counselor directly. If you have not updated your VP yet and you call, you will connect with a VRS interpreter, and then you will be directed to an ASL counselor. But, if you update your VP, you will be able to easily connect to the ASL counselor directly. [The screen fades to show a thumbnail of a faded white background of a doctor holding hands with another individual] Deaf. Healthy. DeafHealth. Learn more at www.deafhealthaccess.org.] 

Focus Group Findings: Pandemic Response Inaccessible

Co-creating the future of healthcare is 🔑 to equitable access for deaf and hard of hearing communities. Today, DeafHealth unveils its most recent Findings from focus groups in Minnesota examining what our communities need in public health crises, specifically vaccine experiences. We found three consistent cultural needs:  

1️. Need for tailored, accessible communication strategies.  

2. Standardized access to accommodations and interpreters.  

3. Desire for consistent and current information. 

We received grant funding from the Minnesota Department of Health to investigate and improve access to resources and knowledge on COVID-19 and vaccination for our deaf communities. Read the full report here.

Stay Informed in ASL: We’ve got you covered! Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for new and current health updates. 

Video Description and Transcript

Video Description: The post has a video thumbnail with blue shading overlaid. The middle has a text bubble that reads “What do we need for future crises?” in white text with rose background. In the video: A woman with long brown hair pulled back and a black shirt faces the camera. 

Transcript: I love our focus groups. That opportunity to sit down with a group, engage, listen, consider different perspectives, identify consistencies, and witness our beautiful communities. DeafHealth prioritizes focus groups and community listening. We just published the findings report of our most recent focus group in Minnesota. We found three powerful themes: Theme 1: Need for tailored, accessible communication strategies catered to our community needs. Theme 2: Standardized access to interpreters and accommodations. Theme 3: Desire for consistent and current information. Curious to learn more? Click the link below or sign up for updates to participate in the next focus group. [The screen fades to show a thumbnail of a faded white background of a doctor holding hands with another individual] Deaf. Healthy. DeafHealth. Learn more at www.deafhealthaccess.org.]

DeafHealth Attends NPAF Story Slam

DeafHealth’s Jessica Kennedy shared the experiences of Deaf patients navigating the healthcare system at the @National Patient Advocate Foundation’s Story Slam. Storytellers like Jessica shared their real and painful experiences that contribute to mistrust in our healthcare system, and the huge need for change.

DeafHealth continues to advocate for equity in healthcare. Watch DeafHealth’s story here: 

Stay Informed in ASL: We’ve got you covered! Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for new and current health updates. 

Inequitable Gap in Telehealth for Deaf Patients

Telehealth has transformed healthcare, but challenges still persist for many deaf patients, resulting in an inequitable gap of services and care. In a recent interview, DeafHealth explained the experiences and consequences of existing telehealth services:  
 

  1. Lack of captioning and interpreter options: Many telehealth platforms do not offer captioning or the ability to add an interpreter, making it impossible for deaf individuals to fully participate in appointments. 
  1. Difficulty in scheduling appointments: Deaf patients may encounter challenges scheduling appointments, as some healthcare providers may not be familiar with or able to use video relay services and other accommodations. 
  1. Inadequate support: Deaf patients may experience abrupt appointment cancellations or changes, difficulties in contacting healthcare providers, and a lack of responsiveness to their needs. 

 
As a result, patients can avoid seeking care. One deaf patient put it simply: “being hung up on like that and unable to fully participate with my doctor was demeaning. What happened to me is a very common experience for deaf and hard of hearing individuals seeking telehealth services and a large reason why we avoid it.”  

Check it out:

https://www.kxxv.com/news/national/challenges-with-telehealth-persist-for-deaf-patients-and-others

Stay Informed in ASL: We’ve got you covered! Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for new and current health updates. 

Join DeafHealth!

We are DeafHealth and we are here to make waves (insert wave emoji) Join our cause by signing up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for new and current health updates at @deafhealthaccess!  

Video Description and Transcript

Video Description:

The post has a video thumbnail with teal background. The middle has a white text bubble that reads “Join DeafHealth” in Rose, light blue, and dark blue font. On top of the thumbnail are three images of 3 women who represent DeafHealth. In the video: the camera cuts between three different women signing to the camera. The first is a woman with brown curly hair and a black dress with clear rimmed glasses. The second woman is a woman with long blonde hair and a black shirt. The third woman has long brown hair and wears a blazer.

Transcript:

(First woman) Access in healthcare for deaf communities needs to change. (Second woman) We are ready to lead that change. (Third woman) We are rolling our sleeves and actively participating in that change. Join us. [The screen fades to show a thumbnail of a faded white background of a doctor holding hands with another individual] Deaf. Healthy. DeafHealth. Learn more at www.deafhealthaccess.org.]

Focus Group Findings: Pandemic Response Inaccessible

🚨 This is what inaccessibility looks like during a pandemic for deaf people.

Through our focus groups, many participants shared similar experiences and identified the following themes addressing accessibility and trust:

1️. A centralized, accessible hub;
2. Unbiased and transparent information;
3. Cultural and linguistic appropriateness; and
4. A right to advocacy and bridging gaps with public officials.

We recently received grant funding from the Minnesota Department of Health to investigate and improve access to resources and knowledge on COVID-19 and vaccination for our deaf communities. Read the full report here.

Stay Informed in ASL: We’ve got you covered! Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for new and current health updates. 

Video Description and Transcript

Video Description:

The post has a video thumbnail with blue shading overlaid. The middle has a text bubble that reads “The stark reality of a pandemic” in white text with rose background. In the video: A woman with long blonde hair is sitting in front of the camera and she is wearing a black shirt and pink lipstick.

Transcript:

This is what inaccessibility looks like in a pandemic for deaf people: Confusing varied sources of information. Few, qualified trustworthy sources. Lack of cultural & linguistic appropriate information in ASL. Difficulty in bridging gaps. These experiences were unfortunately extremely common. We recently received a grant from the State of Minnesota to investigate and improve access with services and knowledge related toCOVID-19 and vaccination for our deaf communities. When we hosted focus groups to gather your experiences and perspectives, there was unanimous agreement on having had similar experiences. It is critical for us to document these findings and share with state and federal government, policy makers, and decision makers so they can better understand our experiences and needs and how we can improve the healthcare system. We are ready to lead that change.  [The screen fades to show a thumbnail of a faded white background of a doctor holding hands with another individual] Deaf. Healthy. DeafHealth. Learn more at www.deafhealthaccess.org.].]

What Does Our Community Engagement Look Like?

At DeafHealth, community engagement is at the heart of what we do. What’s that? Let us break it down for you!

Want more updates on our community engagement work? Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for more.

Video Description and Transcript

Video Description:

The post has a video thumbnail with blue shading overlaid. The middle has a text bubble that reads “Community engagement at DeafHealth” in white text with rose background. In the video: A woman with long blonde hair is sitting in front of the camera and she is wearing a black shirt and pink lipstick.

Transcript:

What does DeafHealth do? We do community engagement. That looks like: Working with our communities, listening, and gathering information, your feedback, opinions, and perspectives. We also provide information, resources, support, and we help connect. One example is our focus groups. Focus groups are a powerful tool to use for research, project implementation, or problem solving. It’s important to include us deaf people too. Curious what our focus groups look like? Stay tuned! [The screen fades to show a thumbnail of a faded white background of a doctor holding hands with another individual] Deaf. Healthy. DeafHealth. Learn more at www.deafhealthaccess.org.]

Meet DeafHealth: Aylah Cadwell

Meet Aylah Cadwell, the vibrant face behind much of DeafHealth's social media. Aylah is dedicated to making healthcare content accessible and approachable in American Sign Language (ASL). Accessibility is personal to her, and here is why...

DeafHealth is a radically different healthcare advocacy organization. We are Deaf-led, Deaf-operated, and Deaf-community-centered. Each of us represents DeafHealth. Together we are Deaf & healthy.

Stay Informed in ASL: We’ve got you covered! Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for new and current health updates. 

Video Description and Transcript

Video Description:

The post has a video thumbnail with blue shading overlaid. The middle has a text bubble that reads “Meet DeafHealth” in white text with rose background. In the video: A woman with curly brown hair is sitting in front of the camera on a blue couch with decorative items behind her.

Transcript:

Hello, my name is Aylah Cadwell, name sign, “Aylah.” I learned ASL for the first time when I was 9-10 years old. I grew up in a hearing family and I didn’t really have language access. Learning ASL changed my life. I have a personal deep understanding of how important language access is for everyone. That’s my motivation. I get a sense of satisfaction from knowing that I am doing my part to make the world a little bit more of an accessible place. That’s what I do here at DeafHealth. I want to empower you to make informed decisions about your health because you deserve that. [The screen fades to show a thumbnail of a faded white background of a doctor holding hands with another individual] Deaf. Healthy. DeafHealth. Learn more at www.deafhealthaccess.org.]

Meet DeafHealth: Allysa Dittmar

Topics covered: suicide, therapy, and 911.* 
 
Meet Allysa Dittmar, our Senior Director of DeafHealth. Allysa is a Deaf public health professional from Johns Hopkins. She has a keen eye for detail, but it’s her heart that she pours into DeafHealth. Here is her story… 

DeafHealth is a radically different healthcare advocacy organization. We are Deaf-led, Deaf-operated, and Deaf-community-centered. Each of us represents DeafHealth. Together we are Deaf & healthy. 

*We are creating a space to have safe discussions about difficult topics. If you have comments, please share with respect and consideration to others. Today, we are grateful to have accessible services like National Deaf Therapy, Deaf LEAD, Deaf Counseling Center, and more. If you or someone you know is struggling, please reach out to support services such as your physician, the local ER, or the suicide prevention hotline in ASL at www.988lifeline.org and click ASL NOW. 

Stay Informed in ASL: We’ve got you covered! Sign up with your email at deafhealthaccess.org/sign-up or follow us on social media for new and current health updates. 

Video Description and Transcript

Video Description:

Video Description: The post has a video thumbnail with blue shading overlaid. The middle has a text bubble that reads “Meet DeafHealth” in white text with rose background. On the bottom left corner, the text bubble reads “Topics Covered: Suicide, 911, & Therapy.” In the video: A woman with blonde long hair is standing in front of the camera and she is wearing a dark green sweater and red lipstick. 

Transcript:

My defining moment when I became a healthcare advocate was when my mother passed away from suicide. That day was extremely traumatizing. I couldn’t call 911 for help. I couldn’t text 911 either. I had no access. Hearing people often don’t face these barriers. In fact, maybe they take it for granted. I looked for therapy in sign language to process my grief and trauma. I couldn’t find any. Eight years later, I finally found help in my language. Looking back, I don’t want anyone, including that little girl, to go through any of that again. It’s time to break barriers. [The screen fades to show a thumbnail of a faded white background of a doctor holding hands with another individual] Deaf. Healthy. DeafHealth. Learn more at www.deafhealthaccess.org.]